Virginians for Jobs & the Economy

West Virginia Benefits

How MVP will benefit you

 

West Virginia County Benefits

 

 

Braxton County

The Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) will have numerous economic benefits to West Virginia and Braxton County due to pipeline operations, ad valorem taxes, construction spending, and direct use of natural gas.  The project could generate up to $1.5 million to Braxton County in property taxes once the pipeline is in service.  The MVP project developers are expected to spend $811 million on West Virginia-based labor, goods, and services. 

Given that natural gas and electricity are the main heating sources in the county, the MVP project could provide supplemental natural gas supply as native production declines over time.  This would help residents with the cost of heating their homes and businesses.

In addition, the manufacturing sector in Braxton County plays a vital role as it employs around 9% of the workforce and pays around 35% higher wages than the county average.  Much of the local industry requires large amounts of natural gas to operate and MVP would help ensure reliable access to a low-cost fuel source.  Increased supply would remove a barrier to expansion opportunities.

 

Doddridge County

The MVP project is expected to spend $811 million on West Virginia-based labor, goods, and services during the construction phase of this project alone.  This could directly benefit Doddridge County along with on-going pipeline operations, ad valorem taxes, and direct use of natural gas.  Ongoing operation of the pipeline would support a total of 54 jobs across the state with average annual wages and benefits of $65,000.

The Mountain Valley Pipeline could generate up to $470,000 in property taxes per year once the pipeline is in service.  This natural gas service will provide a low-cost, reliable and clean alternative to current heating sources in Doddridge County.  While there is not much manufacturing in the county, this new access to low-cost natural gas can attract future manufacturers to the county.

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Fayette County

The MVP project is expected to create 4,500 jobs and spend $811 million on West Virginia-based labor, goods and services to support construction of the project.  With its established manufacturing base, Fayette County is well positioned to benefit from the jobs and project windfall.

Once MVP is operational, the pipeline could generate up to $840,000 in additional property taxes to Fayette County and create 54 jobs in the state with average annual salaries of $65,000.

The industry of Fayette County will be better positioned to sustain and grow jobs due to reliable access to a low-cost fuel source.  The county’s largest manufacturers, WVA Manufacturing in Alloy heavily rely on natural gas to produce silicon metals.  Increased natural gas supply from MVP would help provide opportunities for expansions to manufacturers.

 

 

Greenbrier County

The proposed Mountain Valley pipeline will create jobs, increase revenue and increase low-cost clean natural gas to Greenbrier County.  Once the pipeline is operational, the project could generate up to $1.7 million in annual county ad valorem taxes.  While natural gas generally is available in the major towns in the county, Greenbrier’s residents use primarily electricity (47%) for home heating with only 20% using natural gas. This large discrepancy presents a potentially large savings opportunity for residents, business and municipalities by switching to natural gas.

Greenbrier County’s manufacturers employ around 800 people and their annual wages are 23% higher than the county average. The MVP project would help ensure reliable access to natural gas and provide opportunities for manufacturing expansions.

 

Harrison County

The Mountain Valley Pipeline developers expect to create 4,500 jobs in Harrison County and ten other counties in West Virginia during the construction phase alone.  After construction there will be 54 permanent jobs with average wages and benefits of $65,000.  In addition, the MVP project is expected to generate up to $2.1 million in annual Harrison County property taxes once the pipeline is in service.

Employing 2,100 local residents, the manufacturing sector plays a vital role in Harrison County.  On average these jobs pay 35% more than the average across all sectors.  MVP would help ensure reliable access to a low-cost fuel source in efforts to help Harrison County manufactures thrive and grow.

 

Lewis County

The MVP natural gas project is expected to spend over $811 million in Lewis County and ten other counties in West Virginia during the construction phase alone.  This spending would support 4,500 jobs and add $594 million in cumulative gross regional product in West Virginia during that period.  The MVP project could generate up to $2.0 million in annual Lewis County property taxes once the pipeline is up and running. 

The manufacturing sector employ around 200 locals in Lewis County.  The MVP project could provide opportunities for re-investment and expansion in the county’s manufacturing sector as MVP would bring increased supply of affordable fuel.

Additionally, Lewis County has approximately 90 school buses, waste disposal trucks and other county vehicles, which if converted from gasoline and diesel, would yield approximately $67,000 in annual savings.  These saving could increase significantly if fuel prices rise.  The MVP project would help ensure Lewis County is able to take advantage of clean reliable natural resources.

 

Monroe County

Monroe County is home to a population of 13,502 (2010 census), but yet natural gas service is offered only in the towns of Union and Peterstown.  The MVP project could help provide additional supplies to service the residential, commercial and municipal consumers wanting to switch to low-cost natural gas. 

The MVP project could also generate up to $1.8 million in additional annual tax revenue to the county when the pipeline becomes operational.  During the construction phase the MVP project developers expect to spend over $811 million and create up to 4,500 jobs in Monroe and ten other counties in the state.

Manufactures in Monroe County employ 21% of the county’s workforce.  These jobs pay an average annual wage that is 45% higher than the county’s average.  Additional access to natural gas via the Mountain Valley Pipeline can provide an opportunity for manufacturing expansions and attract new manufacturers to the county.

 

Nicholas County

The MVP project could generate up to $2.2 million in annual county property taxes once the pipeline is in service.  This would be a boon to schools, roads and bridges in Nicholas County.  There will also be 54 permanent jobs which pay $64,000 a year in Nicholas and ten other West Virginia counties.

Out of the 25,233 residents of Nicholas County (2010 census) only the consumers in two towns have access to natural gas.  In addition, there is around 700 current jobs in manufacturing. The MVP project could provide a clean low-cost natural gas supply to heat homes and power manufacturers that create and sustain high paying jobs. 

The Mountain Valley Pipeline could allow for further growth in natural gas production in the county, giving developers and outlet to major markets along the MVP route and throughout the Southeast.  These projects create local jobs that pay 30% above the county average.

During the construction phase the MVP developers expect to spend over $811 million on West Virginia-based labor, goods and services, and hirer 4,500 people throughout the eleven counties that MVP will serve.

 

Summers County

Around 80% of residents in Summers County are not able to heat their homes with low-cost natural gas, primarily due to a lack of natural gas infrastructure.  The Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) could provide additional gas supplies to lower served areas.  The MVP project could help lower heating cost and spur the attraction of manufacturing jobs in Summers County.

The MVP project could produce up to $890,000 in yearly Summers County property taxes once the pipeline is in service. Ongoing operation of the pipeline would also support 54 jobs that pay $65,000 a year in Summers and ten other West Virginia counties.  4,500 West Virginia jobs will be created by the MVP developers to support peak construction of the pipeline.  This is in addition to the over $811 million MVP project developers expect to spend on West Virginia-based labor, goods and services.

 

Webster County

There is currently no natural gas service in Webster County.  Residents, businesses and municipalities could benefit greatly from the MVP project. The Mountain Valley Pipeline’s planned route would pass within miles of Cowen and Camden-on-Gauly.  MVP could deliver low-cost natural gas to heat homes and power manufacturing jobs. 

The manufacturing sector employs about 9% of the county’s workforce with a strong presence of wood and lumber product manufacturing.  The county has great available industrial sites with well-developed rail infrastructure in place, but a dearth of natural gas supply.  The MVP project would add significant natural gas infrastructure that could unlock the county’s economic development potential.

The MVP project could generate up to $1.6 million in annual Webster County ad valorem taxes once the pipeline is in service.  This local tax windfall could greatly benefit local schools and infrastructure in Webster County.

 

Wetzel County

Manufacturing and natural gas production play a vital role in Wetzel County’s economy.  Over6% of the county’s workforce rely on jobs from these two industries which pay an annual average wage of $74,000.  The MVP project would provide an outlet to gas producers to fast growing markets across the country, while providing local natural gas infrastructure to help fuel homes and industry in Wetzel County.  Ongoing operations of the pipeline would support 54 jobs across the state with average annual wages of $65,000.

In addition, the MVP project could generate up to $1.7 million in annual Wetzel county property taxes once the pipeline is in service.  During MVP project construction, developers are expected to spend over $811 million on West Virginia based labor, goods and services and up to 4,500 jobs during peak construction.  With its established natural gas production and manufacturing base, Wetzel County could contribute labor and other resources to the construction efforts.